Dates that changed the motor industry

1903

Before car dealerships and motor supermarkets became the norm, if you wanted to view all the latest new models you needed to visit the British International Motor Show. First held at Crystal Palace, London. The same year that the speed limit was raised from 14 miles per hour to 20 miles per hour.

This was also the year that driving licences were first introduced at a cost of 5 shillings, 25p in today’s money.

1904

One of Britain’s most iconic car manufacturers, Rolls-Royce Limited, was formed by Charles Stewart Rolls and Frederick Henry Royce.

1907

With 25,000 black cabs in London, it’s easy to forget a time when they weren’t around. This was the year that cabs with meters first began operating in London.

1920

Jumping ahead a few years, Motor Vehicle Excise Duty, otherwise known as car tax, began for the 1 million drivers that were on the road in Britain. Small numbers compared to the 31.3 million cars licensed for use in the UK in March 2018.

1925 – 1935

Considering the number of drivers on the road, it wasn’t until this 10 year period that 3 important aspects of road safety were introduced. Firstly in 1925, the first three-colour traffic signal was installed in London, in 1931 the Highway Code was launched and in 1935 the compulsory driving test was introduced.

1958

Travelling the length and breadth of the UK may be time consuming but compared to 1958 when the first motorway opened, it’s pretty simple.

1960

The MOT test was introduced for cars 10 years old.

1967

The Road Safety Act of 1967 introduced the first maximum legal blood alcohol or drink driving limit but it wasn’t until 16 years later in 83 that it became law for drivers and front passengers to wear seatbelts.

1996

61 years after the driving test, the theory driving test was introduced.

2017

An electric driverless car was tested in public for the first time in Milton Keynes.

The future looks very exciting for the world of cars and we’re looking forward to being a part of it.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *