What’s new from our favourite car brands?

AUDI

Audi’s range continues to expand. New in the showrooms are the latest generation A6 saloon and Avant models, which claims to take autonomous driving to the next level. If you want the ultimate sports estate, then check out the new RS4. If you’re looking for an extra dash of style, have a look at the new second generation A7 Sportback. There’s an all-new A1 Sportback model too, a revised version of the TT sportscar and an all-new second generation version of the Q3 compact SUV.

ONE TO WATCH: The new A1 Sportback is the highest quality supermini yet made.

BMW

The key news for BMW dealers in recent months has been the launch of a second generation version of the company’s mid-sized X4 SUV Coupe. There’s also a fresh lifestyle-orientated option in the form of the new 6 Series Gran Turismo model. In other news, the company has revised its i3 electric range and added a sporty i3s variant. There’s also a new M5 high performance sports saloon, a ‘Competition’ version of the M2 coupe and a roadster version of the top i8 sportscar.

ONE TO WATCH: The X4 is a far more competitive mid-sized premium-badged SUV-Coupe than its predecessor.

BMW X4 Model

FIAT

Fiat has rejuvenated its 500L small MPV – and added a Crossover-style trim level into the range. There’s also a new SUV-orientated Panda model, the Panda Cross. And special ‘Mirror’ versions of the brand’s iconic 500 citycar, plus the 500L and the 500X SUV, all featuring smarter looks and upgraded infotainment. There’s also a sporty new ‘S-Design’ trim level for the Tipo family hatch.

ONE TO WATCH: The Panda Cross is a fun option for citycar buyers.

FORD

The big news for Ford dealers is the launch of a new generation version of the brand’s Focus family hatch. The company has also thoroughly revised its KA+ five-door citycar. The brand also continues to introduce extra variants of the all-new seventh generation Fiesta supermini, including an ST hot hatch and an ‘Active’ Crossover-style variant.

ONE TO WATCH: The new Focus is arguably the most class-competitive family hatch Ford has yet brought us.

Ford Focus

MERCEDES-BENZ

Mercedes has been busy of late, following a flurry of new model activity earlier this year which brought us an all-new A-Class compact family hatch and substantially revised C-Class models. There’s also a new generation version of the executive CLS four-door coupe, which provides some of the engineering for the desirable new Mercedes-AMG GT four-door model.

In addition, the brand’s most capable SUV, the G-Class, has been launched in new generation form. And there’s a new pick-up model, the X-Class in a commercial range that also now includes an all-new version of the company’s Sprinter large van.

ONE TO WATCH: New A-Class offers a premium feel for sensible money.

SEAT

SEAT’s most important recent arrival has been the brand’s first SUV supermini-segment Crossover model, the Arona. This is based on the new generation Ibiza supermini launched last year. In other news, the company introduced a super-hot hatch model, the Leon Cupra R – now sold out, and plans in the future to launch ‘Cupra’ as a separate sub-brand for its high-performance models.

ONE TO WATCH: The Arona will further boost SEAT sales in the SUV sector.

SEAT Arona

VAUXHALL

Vauxhall has just launched hot GSi performance versions of its Corsa supermini and Insignia mid-sized models. The Corsa range has been revised too, with a focus on 1.4-litre power. There’s also an all-new compact family MPV, the Combo Life, just in the showrooms. SUVs occupy much of Vauxhall’s attention these days, following last year’s launch of new Crossland X and Grandland X models – and even an SUV-style version of its citycar, christened the Viva Rocks.

ONE TO WATCH: With its Crossland X and Grandland X SUVs, Vauxhall now has a properly credible crossover line-up.

VOLKSWAGEN

Volkswagen has just launched a new generation version of its Touareg luxury SUV. This follows a busy year, which has seen the brand introduce its new T-Roc mid-sized SUV, its 7-seat Tiguan Allspace and the all-new sixth generation version of the Polo supermini. There’s a hot GTI version of the up! citycar too.

ONE TO WATCH: New Polo is smarter and cleverer, plus offers the option of efficient 1.5 TSI EVO power.

Volkswagen Polo

Are you ready for an Electric Vehicle?

To help you with this decision, we’ve put together a handy guide to everything EV from the need-to-knows to the differences between an Electric and a Hybrid.

If you’d like more information, check out the full guide to Electric Vehicles.

You might think that this technology is new, but the concept of an Electric Vehicle dates back to 1837. They were so popular that 28% of all vehicles on the road in 1900 were electric. Of course, the tech has advanced significantly over the years.

Electric vs Hybrid

Hybrid cars still have a conventional engine but mix this with an electric battery to create a more powerful propulsion system. The electric battery serves as more of a complement to the petrol engine, rather than a primary means of power. Hybrid cars can also store the electrical energy they’ve created, whereas an EV needs to be charged regularly at a power point.

Electric vs Petrol/Diesel

These comparisons are much more noticeable. For one, a conventional engine has a lot more moving parts that an EV. EV also tend to have a shorted range, which is the main concern for most drivers but with constant developments to battery life and investment by the Government to install more charging points, this should hopefully be alleviated over time. The most notable consideration is the smaller amount of pollution caused by an EV compared to a petrol or diesel engine.

What are the benefits of switching to an EV?

One of the main factors when considering an EV is the benefits it has on the environment. Here are just a few:

Renewable energy – Electricity is a form of renewable energy. This means you won’t be expending limited resources, like fossil fuels, to power your car.

Eco-friendly materials – Perhaps unsurprisingly, a lot of EVs are manufactured using base materials which are themselves ecologically beneficial. This is true of a lot of manufacturers, but was most notably done with the creation of the Nissan Leaf.

Lower levels of pollution – Owing to the nature of electric engines, there are far fewer emissions. In fact, an EV has zero polluting elements coming from its exhaust.

Recycled batteries – You’ll be able to recycle the engine (or battery) of an electric car. This reduces the need for production – which in turn lowers the overall damage done to the environment.

There’s also a huge health benefit to more people switching to EV as this can prevent many pollution related illnesses and deaths.

Saving money

Thanks to the lower CO2 emissions and the fact there’s very little overall pollution, electric vehicles are largely exempt from tax and you may find yourself with a little discount of Vehicle Excise Duty if you drive a Hybrid.

In order to encourage more drivers to switch to Electric, the Government have set up plug-in grants via Taxpayer Credit. Check out our full guide to find out how much you could save.

Is an Electric Vehicle right for me?

If you’re not already the proud owner of an electric vehicle, your decision will depend on a number of factors. Choosing an EV isn’t the same as picking a new petrol or diesel car. You’ll need to decide whether you’re the kind of person who’ll benefit from a more environmentally friendly option.

What will you need if for? How far do you need to travel? Are there public charging points near you? Is it right for you and your family?

Deciding to buy an Electric or Hybrid car comes down to your personal circumstances, but if you need help deciding check out our full guide.

Autumn driving risks

Here are some top tips to help drivers cope with the unpredictable Autumn weather.

Coping with… Heavy Rain and Wet Conditions

Watch for leaves and large puddles on the road

Loose leaves that are flattened and wet act just like ice. With puddles, it’s difficult to judge their depth, which could lead to serious damage to your vehicle. Therefore, you should try to avoid both if possible or drive slowly over them, taking extra care.

Prepare your tyres

This goes hand-in-hand with the above tip. Wet or icy roads demand tyres that are in good condition. You need at least 3mm of tread to be legal, but newer tyres are better. Check the pressure too, regularly. Under-inflation means less grip.

Check the condition of your wiper blades

In the more autumnal misty, murky conditions you need wiper blades in tip top condition. Clean them with a soft cloth and ensure they are in full working condition. If your sight is limited in any way while using them, replace them as soon as possible.

Coping with… Dark Commutes

High beams on standby 

Give your headlights and rear lights a clean and make sure all are in working condition, including the high beams. But remember, try to only use the high beams when you really need them and not when other drivers are approaching.

Take sunglasses

With the shorter days comes a lower sun which can be awkwardly placed during your morning and evening drive. Often, it’s so low that even the sun visor can’t block it. Sunglasses will help.

Stay alert

The darker mornings and evenings may leave you feeling drowsier behind the wheel. To avoid this, make sure you get enough sleep the night before, swap drivers if possible during long trips and drink caffeine if necessary. If you find yourself growing tired, pull over to rest or stretch your legs.  

Coping with… Frost

Give yourself extra time in the mornings

It can be a pain, but it’s very dangerous to only scrape a small viewing hole in the windscreen and then rush off to work. To avoid the frost altogether, park your car in a garage or cover it overnight.

Check antifreeze levels

Antifreeze prevents the water in the engine’s cooling system from freezing. You can contact a professional mechanic to check this for you, or buy an antifreeze tester for a small price.

Check the battery

As the weather turns colder, your car will need to take more energy from the battery. It’s best to inspect your battery this time of year to make sure it can survive the autumn and winter; you can always buy a car battery tester to do this.

Coping with… High Winds

Monitor your speed

The faster you drive, the more likely you are to lose control. Always monitor your speed, take your time and keep a good extra distance between yourself and other cars.

Anticipate debris

Prepare yourself for sporadic bits of debris in the road or even fallen trees. This is another reason for keeping your speed low in high winds.

Don’t travel unless necessary

Check before you leave and if the conditions on the road are hazardous or you feel uncomfortable driving in such weather, do not attempt to do so unless necessary.  

Then and Now – The UK’s most popular cars

The endless changes don’t just finish at how they look on the outside, most of their updates are spawned from the manufacturer keeping up with changes in technology, production and what’s under the bonnet to stay competitive and relevant in the car industry – which is all good news for car buyers!

So we’ve taken a look at some of the UK’s, and our, most popular models and how they have changed since they were first created.

Ford Focus

Ford Focus 2001 model

Succeeding the just as popular Ford Escort, the Focus was first introduced back in 1998 and has became a staple family car ever since. It came in various sizes from a 3-door hatchback to 5-door saloon. Features included CD/Radio, heated front windscreen and air conditioning.

Ford Focus 2018 model

In 2018, the fourth generation Focus was revealed to mark the brand’s 20th anniversary. The overall design these days has a much sportier feel. The latest model is packed with technology such as the FordPass connect, which enhances the Sat Nav system with real-time traffic updates, in-car Wi-Fi hotspot and additional remote features like starting your engine from the comfort of your own home.

BMW 3 Series

BMW 3 series 1989 model

Released as a compact executive car back in 1975, the BMW 3 Series was the successor to the 2 series and has seen 6 different generations. Available originally as a 2-door sedan, the range has expanded throughout the years to include a 2-door convertible, 4-door sedan and 5-door hatchback amongst others. In addition to winning several awards over the years, it is BMW’s bestselling model.

BMW 3 series 2018 model

In its most recent incarnation, the coupe and convertible models have been split from the range and sold as the BMW 4 Series. If you’re looking for something a bit special, the M3 is the most powerful of the 3 series, developed by the brand’s in-house motorsport division. The 2018 Saloon model comes with a £27,800 OTR price and top speed of 130mph.

Volkswagen Golf

Volkswagen Golf 1982 model

One of only three cars that has ever been voted European Car of the Year twice, the Volkswagen Golf is the brand’s bestselling model. A compact car produced since 1974, the first generation was designed as a replacement for the Beetle, coming away from the rounder style to a more boxy shape. They later introduced the GTI variation in 1976 aimed at those who craved extra performance. The Golf was so popular for the brand that by 1988 VW had sold 10 million of the model worldwide.

Volkswagen Golf 2018 model

Now on its 7th generation, it’s had a few facelifts as well as an electric model, the e-Golf, and a plug-in hybrid with the Golf GTE. The Golf has become popular within motorsports and particularly with younger customers looking for something sporty and high quality. Still a very popular car within the UK and around Europe, despite the emissions scandal Volkswagen faced in 2015. Can anything stop the success of the Golf?

Fiat 500

Fiat 500 1959 model

It’s hard to believe that this popular car has such a long history, back to 1957 when it was first born. It was originally known as the ‘Cinquecento’ and was created as a cheap, functional town car for the people of Italy. Designed as a two-seater and only 9 feet long, it wasn’t until 1958 that the car became hugely popular due to improvements such as an opening sunroof. The 500 has had several versions over the years including the Fiat L, or Lusso, but sadly production ended in 1975 after the launch of its replacement, the Fiat 126.

Fiat 500 Mirror 2018 edition

More than 30 years after production had ceased, Fiat decided to bring back the classic little car. Staying true to its retro styling, the new 500 was a modern interpretation with many noticeable changes such as moving the rear mounted engine to the front. One of the 500’s most appealing traits, especially with the younger market, is its different colours options and quirky interior. It’s also been updated with USB connectivity, Bluetooth, DAB and Sat Nav options. It’s easy to see why it has become one of the UK’s most loved small cars.

Luckily for you, whether you prefer the original, the latest model or something in between, you’ll find a huge range of cars at Exchange and Mart/s1cars.

Past, present and predicting the future

Over the years, the magazine became synonymous with motors and even a household name, with name drops in iconic TV shows like Only Fools and Horses to 8 out of 10 cats to Jools Holland’s Hootenany. Famous faces from the motor industry appeared in the magazine, including Jenson Button and Vicki-Butler Henderson.

During this time, car buying was changing. People needed to be able to search for, and buy, their car more conveniently. Dealerships started opening later in the evening and at the weekends and shopping online became more and more popular. In 2009, Exchange and Mart decided to focus solely on their website and ceased printing of the magazine.

Online classified sites like Exchange and Mart, allow the customer to visit an ‘online forecourt’ where instead of viewing tens of cars, they can view over 100,000. And the variation of cars doesn’t just stop at price and colour, the oldest car on the site is from 1913, almost as old as Exchange and Mart itself!

It’s undeniable that the automotive industry is one of the most fast-paced, not only in terms of technology in cars, but also in the way that people buy their car. For example, you can now live chat with a sales person or product genius 24/7, watch video reviews and even buy your car online and have it delivered straight to your door.

So what does the future hold?

When it comes to all things political a good idea seems great on paper but, as they say, the devil’s in the detail. So, while we may have just about finalised the UK’s Brexit negotiations by 2068, even with all the talk of Electric Vehicles or EVs, your car is highly likely to still involve a petrol power unit – but a plug-in hybrid version.

Looking forward 100 years we could well see high tech electric vehicles where there’s no need of a driver and everything will be connected so you can truly work, rest and play in your car. But in any large town or city, we put our money on it being the wheels of the bus going round and round.

With the idea of driving a car daily into work being priced out of the pocket of every day folk by city taxes and high parking charges, we reckon you’ll be hopping on the latest “Enviro Bus”. That’s if you’re not working from home in the first place.

But when it comes to predicting our means of transport in 150 years’ time, well, that’s anyone’s guess.

Safety and tech we take for granted

But imagine a time where parking sensors didn’t exist and the biggest development in terms of safety was seat belts.

It’s the past developments of features like the seat belt and even starter motors that without those discoveries, wouldn’t have led on us to modern day advances like stop/start, cruise control and even starting the engine from your own home.

Let’s have a look at the motoring inventions that have paved the way.

Starter Motors

Before the starter motor, most cars would need to be hand cranked. Not always as easy as it sounds. Get it wrong and a broken wrist or even a broken arm could be the result.

It was Clyde J. Coleman who invented and patented the first electric starter in America in 1903. In 2018, remote starters are proving more and more popular, so that you can start you car from inside your house to warm everything up or get the air-con working. Just remember that you need to get in and actually drive it.

More standard engine features include start/stop technology which allows the car to come to complete stop, saving fuel when stationary.

Tyres

We take a smooth ride for granted today, but wooden spoked wheels with metal rims were what the first cars rode on.

It was John Dunlop in 1887 who first developed practical tyres for his son’s bicycle. In 1890 he was manufacturing car tyres from a factory in Belfast and it was in 1946 that Michelin invented the radial tyre. Today the tyre choice is enormous with run-flat tyres and nitrogen gas filled tyres becoming more common place, along with tyres specifically for summer and winter, improving handling and stopping distance all year round.

With the developments of tyres, new safety features like Brake Assist Systems can rely not only on cameras and radar technology but the reliance on the tyres themselves.

Seat Belts

It was following World War II that a greater focus on car safety began. Car design slowly changed, and during the 1950s seat belts became an optional extra with more and more manufacturers. It was after the Saab GT 750, displayed at the 1958 New York Motor Show featuring seat belts as standard that the practice became commonplace.

In the UK advertising encouraged drivers and passengers to use them on every journey, and in 1983, it became law for drivers and front seat passengers to belt up. Today, all passengers need to wear seat belts with many coming with ISOFIX points making fitting child seats much easier.

But there is a down side to all this new technology. A recent survey revealed that it is evolving faster than the typical driver’s understanding.

It highlights the importance of a good dealer, who’s willing to spend the time with you when you buy the car (and perhaps at a later date), to take you through all that amazing tech.

But as we’ve seen, this new technology can help make driving easier and safer, and is definitely here to stay.

Dates that changed the motor industry

1903

Before car dealerships and motor supermarkets became the norm, if you wanted to view all the latest new models you needed to visit the British International Motor Show. First held at Crystal Palace, London. The same year that the speed limit was raised from 14 miles per hour to 20 miles per hour.

This was also the year that driving licences were first introduced at a cost of 5 shillings, 25p in today’s money.

1904

One of Britain’s most iconic car manufacturers, Rolls-Royce Limited, was formed by Charles Stewart Rolls and Frederick Henry Royce.

1907

With 25,000 black cabs in London, it’s easy to forget a time when they weren’t around. This was the year that cabs with meters first began operating in London.

1920

Jumping ahead a few years, Motor Vehicle Excise Duty, otherwise known as car tax, began for the 1 million drivers that were on the road in Britain. Small numbers compared to the 31.3 million cars licensed for use in the UK in March 2018.

1925 – 1935

Considering the number of drivers on the road, it wasn’t until this 10 year period that 3 important aspects of road safety were introduced. Firstly in 1925, the first three-colour traffic signal was installed in London, in 1931 the Highway Code was launched and in 1935 the compulsory driving test was introduced.

1958

Travelling the length and breadth of the UK may be time consuming but compared to 1958 when the first motorway opened, it’s pretty simple.

1960

The MOT test was introduced for cars 10 years old.

1967

The Road Safety Act of 1967 introduced the first maximum legal blood alcohol or drink driving limit but it wasn’t until 16 years later in 83 that it became law for drivers and front passengers to wear seatbelts.

1996

61 years after the driving test, the theory driving test was introduced.

2017

An electric driverless car was tested in public for the first time in Milton Keynes.

The future looks very exciting for the world of cars and we’re looking forward to being a part of it.

Car DIY jobs you can do at home

Clean Everything Meticulously

Cleaning a car is more than just washing and waxing its exterior. Sadly, most people do not clean their car thoroughly enough which can cause rust and various mechanical issues. However, it isn’t just the mechanics you need to consider when you’re cleaning your car. Just like beauty, it’s what’s inside that counts, especially under the bonnet. The longer that you spend cleaning your car, the longer that you effectively spend inspecting it and finding issues that you can resolve cheaply and effectively, without the need for a mechanic.

Scrubbing Up the Insides

You may love the way that your car looks on the outside, but don’t forget that you’ll spend the majority of your time inside it. Small, simple changes can make the world of difference, and even a cheap new trim can vastly improve the interior if it is fitted well.

The dashboard in particular will suffer from wear and tear over a lengthy period of time and, as a result, it could hinder your ability to drive properly. If the dashboard pad is faded, consider repainting or dyeing it. After all, you’re going to spend a lot of time staring at it. 

Finally, consider the seat fabrics as well as any mats or flooring fabrics. As you get in and out of the car constantly, the fabric or leather will rip and strain, wearing away over time. Simply changing the floor mats and even shampooing the seats could make all the difference.

 

Seal, Waterproof and Safeguard

On a rainy day, your car is a safe haven that protects you from the horrors of the outside world. However, over time the seal that surrounds your doors can wear away. In the short term, this will only cause limited problems and you may only notice a little bit of wind when you drive. But, as time passes by, these gaps will only grow, and rain will soon start to get in.

The rubber strips that you need for this task are incredibly cheap but, admittedly, the task of replacing them is time consuming and somewhat frustrating. It is, however, well worth it in the long run.

Repair Damaged Paintwork

When it comes to making your car look as beautiful as the day that it first left the production line, touch-up paint is your best friend. Scratches, scrapes and chips are all commonplace, no matter how careful your driving is.

But be wary of touching up the paint too often as your paintwork will become uneven and patchy (especially if you do not have an exact colour match). Use it sparingly and only when a scratch is noticeable. As a general rule of thumb, it is never as bad as it looks anyway.

 

Wheels and Tyres

Getting a higher level of performance from your tyres can be as easy as making sure that they’re correctly inflated. This may sound simple, but it is something many car owners forget, and their vehicles suffer as a result.

Your car’s tyres are central to its success, improving the handling, stopping distance and performance. Tyre maintenance is simple and constantly monitoring their tread and checking for punctures is the best way to prevent any accidents.

So, there we have it, simple ways that you can maintain your classic at home; all without the need for an expensive mechanic. 

Best cars for summer in the UK

Beach days

There’s nothing better than clocking off work early, gathering up your friends, grabbing a couple of disposable BBQs and heading off to the nearest beach. To get there you’ll need a car small enough to fit in any tight car parking space, enough space to pack a beach ball and full of fun! How about getting the top down too and enjoying the cool sea breeze?

MINI Cooper Convertible

An icon of British motoring, the MINI Cooper not only looks good but is great fun to drive, especially with the top down. There’s not a whole lot of room in the boot but it’s big enough for the essentials, like sun tan lotion and a few beers! For a used model you could expect to pay just under £3,000 but if you fancy a brand-new model you could drive away with one from around £19,795.

Happy campers

If you feel like disconnecting from the modern world for a few days, switching off the wi-fi and getting back to basics, a camping holiday can be fun for all the family. Picture toasting marshmallows by the fire, long walks, fishing and even scary ghost stories. But you’re going to need a big car to pack all that fun into.

Hyundai i40 Estate

This car is perfect if you need plenty of luggage space but somewhere comfortable, and safe, for your passengers. There’s space for tents, chairs, blow-up mattresses, and the kitchen sink! It’s ideal for attaching bike racks and roof boxes for even more storage space. Prices for a used model can start around £6,000, so lots of car for your money, but start from £21,610 for a brand-new model.

Family stay-cay

Are you swapping Lanzarote for the Lake District this year? Then make sure you’ve got the perfect car to not only get you from A to B, but from work mode to holiday mode. If your destination is a long drive away, you’re going to need a car that’s comfortable, safe and has plenty of leg room for the whole family.

Vauxhall Zafira 7-seater

You don’t need to choose between the dog and granny anymore, no one gets left behind with a 7-seater Vauxhall Zafira. Don’t need all the seats? Just fold down the rear two and enjoy the extra boot space – shopping trip anyone? Sadly, production finished in 2018, but you can get an absolute bargain on a used Zafira from the early 2000s for under £1,000, all the way up to £25,000 for an 18-plate. Just don’t forget to stow away your tray tables!

Festival with friends

If one thing screams summer in the UK it’s a festival. Whether it’s Glastonbury, Wireless, TRNSMT or even a gig in your local park – music never sounded so good than when the sun is shining. But if you’re going full festival and heading away for the weekend, you’ll need a ride that’s reliable, easy to park, packed with all the latest tech and superb sound system.

Abarth 595

Fancy a Fiat 500 with an edge? Be the envy of all your mates with a festival-ready 595. Your mates will be bribing you for a lift when you rock up in this nifty number. It’s guaranteed to have you standing out from the crowd and is pretty handy in those tight parking spaces. If you’re looking for a used model be prepared for prices to start around £6,000. Prices for a brand-new model depend on the level of spec and extras you choose, but can start from around £20,000.

Carry on caravanning

With the number of people spending their summer holidays in the UK rising, caravan holidays are becoming more popular every year. Whether it’s hiring out a static caravan or investing in your own motorhome, it can be the perfect British summer holiday. If you like touring around the UK, visiting different locations each day, then a motorhome could be your perfect ride.

We’re not just about cars, you can also search a huge range of caravans, motorhomes and campervans from local dealers and private sellers throughout the UK.

Tips for selling your car

1. Tidy car means tidy profit

It may sound obvious, but you’d be surprised at the amount of car adverts we’ve seen that feature untidy or dirty cars. This can give off the impression that the car hasn’t been cared for or is unloved by its current owner. Even if the car isn’t being used at the time of selling it, give it a good clean and tidy before taking any photos and especially before viewings. A viewer wants to know that the car has been taken care of and it was valued by its current owner. Plus, giving the car a nice clean can make it look newer and possibly help you get the price you’re looking for.

2. Get the right balance of photos

Once you’ve given the car a good clean, it’s time for the photos. A good set of photos can convince someone to call for a viewing so getting the right balance is key. One photo could mean you’re trying to hide something, whereas putting too many on can mean the buyer scrolling for too long and becoming disinterested. Make sure you take a few external shots, from the front, back and sides. If it’s a convertible, take some with the roof up and down. Use the photos to highlight any good features like alloy wheels and body kits. Don’t forget the interior, highlighting features like leather seats, entertainment systems and even the boot size. Aim for 5-6 photos, a mix of inside and out.

3. Be honest

There’s nothing worse than thinking you’ve found the car for you and turning up for a viewing to find its not what was advertised. When selling a used car, it’s common for the car to have wear and tear so don’t shy away from being honest. If you’re upfront with the car’s flaws and a buyer still wants to view it, you’ll have a better chance of selling it due to the trust you’ve built with the buyer. Provide as much information about its history as possible and never lie, most buyers will run their own checks anyway. If the car is right for them, they’ll buy it, warts and all.

4. Avoid overpricing

We understand that you want to get the best price for your car, but this can lead to overpricing and can put buyers off even before they’ve had a proper look. Remember you’re selling a used car and that comes with a used price. Just because you value it at a certain price, doesn’t mean someone is willing to pay that. Do some research to see what the going rate for your model is. Is your car in better or worse condition? Is there any additional features that your car has? If you’re willing to negotiate, let buyers know. It’s also important that you don’t sell for too little, decide on a price you’d be happy with yourself and try to not go below that. If a buyer knows you’re keen to sell quickly, they might take advantage. It’s all about coming to an agreement that you’re both happy with.

5. Make sure your advert is seen

There are many options when it comes to the best place to sell your car, but the smart choice is with Exchange and Mart and s1cars. Setting up your advert is quick, simple and can cost as little as £5 for 2 weeks. Even better, if you’re selling a classic car that is more than 25 years old, it’s free! There’s a reason why buyers and sellers have been relying on us for over 150 years, so if you’re looking to sell your car then place your ad today.

Selling your car and looking to upgrade? Whether it’s something newer, smaller or bigger – search thousands of cars in stock today.